Tag Archives: John Gorrie

Who’s Round Archive 11-16

Continuing the removal of the individual episode blurbs from the Podcast page and placing them here instead, for reasons of tidiness…

Cort & StensonEpisode Eleven (2nd April 2013)The Keys Of Marinus Special
What do you do if you get a Doctor Who story that doesn’t have a DVD Making Of and that not one, but four people involved with the production of it are happy to speak to you? That’s right, you produce an hour long special edition featuring the director, two monsters, and an actor who has never spoken publicly about his work on the show until now! Chosen charities: The Red Cross, Mind, Cancer, YMCA (extra long edition, four interviewees, so more charities than normal, but deserving ones).

EpisodDoig and Colee Twelve  (16th April 2013) Clive Doig and Paul Cole
Perhaps the merriest Who’s Round yet : red wine is spilt, honest opinions tumble out, and we turn the conviciality up to 11, managing to polish off a fair few Hartnells, plus a bonus snippet of Troughton as well. Two interviewees for the price of none, and by the time it’s over, it has been everybody’s round! Chosen charity: The Cinema & Television Benevolent Fund.

saul metzsteinEpisode Thirteen – (18th April 2013)  Saul Metzstein
A first for Who’s Round : previews of epiosdes yet to be broadcast at the time of the interview. Director Saul talks us through why he thinks Doctor Who is like a musical, discusses how best to shoot Matt Smith, and reveals which baddie was based on Peter Stringfellow. Chosen charity: The World Wildlife Fund.

EpiWilliam Dudmansode Fourteen – (24 April 2013) William Dudman
A fascinating insight behind-the-scenes from film cameraman Bill, who shot most of the effects sequences during the McCoy years but also has first hand knowledge of a Troughton classic for good measure. He also had major input into Star Cops, Blackadder and The Two Ronnies, and tells all about those as well. Chosen Charity: Crisis.

Peter Thomas (copped) Episode Fifteen – (29th April 2013) The Savages Special
Another Hartnell special; this time it’s an adventure entirely missing from the TV archives and two of its guest stars provide their memories of working with William Hartnell, Peter Sellars and Douglas Camfield. It got quite noisy, sorry, but worth it to hear from two such distinguished veterans. Chosen charity: Ellen House Hospice For Terminally Ill Children.

barrie inghamEpisode Sixteen – (1st May 2013) Barrie Ingham
This delightful and enthusiastic thespian’s career was still taking him to London, New York and Hollywood on a regular basis when we spoke. He was impressively passionate about Doctor Who and we talked about our hopes of lost episodes turning up, shaving chests and getting betting tips from the Doctor. Sadly Barrie passed away in January 2015 and I consider it a great privilege to have had the opportunity to enjoy his charming company, even if it was only over the phone. Chosen Charity: Medicins Sans Frontieres.

ROBIN PHILLIPS RIP

d01-1e-026Robin Phillips, who played Altos in 1964’s The Key’s Of Marinus, has died at the age of 73. A friend of the director, John Gorrie, he was brought aboard to assist the TARDIS crew as they struggled to complete a task (discovering the whereabouts of s series of hidden micro-keys) which they had to compete without being able to rely on the presence of the Doctor (as actor William Hartnell had a two week holiday booked). He is essentially the romantic lead, sharing action duties with William Russell’s Ian, and showing some real grit when facing down the evil Voord as they threaten the object of his affections, Katharine Schofield’s Sabetha.

As David Copperfield
As David Copperfield

Born in Haslemere, Surrey, on 28th February 1942, he left school at 15 but studied acting at the Bristol Old Vic theatre school, and appeared there at the Theatre Royal making his professional stage debut in a season which found him playing Konstantin in The Seagull and Romeo in Romeo And Juliet. Other Bristol productions between 1959 and 1961 included The Clandestine Marriage,and  The Long, The Short And The Tall and he also appeared at the Chichester festival and Oxford Playhouse. In 1962 he broke into television and as well as Doctor Who he clocked up the usual fare that a capable young actor would hope to accrue on his CV – Compact (1962), The Saint (1965), The Avengers (1966), The Forsyte Saga (1967 – star Nicholas Pennell and he would collaborate again in the theatre) and the title role in David Copperfield (1969).

It is for his work as a director that he will be best remembered (he had first dabbled at Bristol), notably his role in revitalising Canada’s Stratford Theatre in Ontario. Prior to relocating to Canada he had directed in the UK for the Hampstead Theatre Club, the RSC and Chichester. There was initially some press resistance that a relatively young Brit  should be taking over a Canadian theatre but he managed to erase what he described as the “twirling, spinning and shouting” that dominated productions and instead create work that was more modern in style and thus easier for the audience to absorb. He lured British theatrical greats such as Maggie Smith (he considered his working relationship with her to be the deepest he had in the business) and Brian Bedford to work alongside fine Canadian actors like Martha Henry whose admiration his working methods quickly provoked.

Robin Phillips - acclaimed director.
Robin Phillips – acclaimed director.

According to actor Barry McGregor “one of the great qualities that makes him what he is is that he teaches as he directs – that is so exciting.” He made “everyone feel valued and important to a production” felt actor Marti Maraden.

He was artistic director there from 1975 to 1980 and directed 40 productions, including a sensual Measure For Measure in his first year, followed by Antony And Cleopatra (with Smith and Bedford), A Midsummer Night’s Dream and King Lear. He returned in 1986-87 to direct Cymbeline and The School For Scandal.

Elsewhere he ran the Grand Theatre at London, Ontario (1983-83), was artistic director at the Citadel Theatre from 1990-1995, helped found the Soulpepper Theatre in 1998 and also directed on Broadway. On the London stage in 2000/2001 he directed Jessica Lange in Long Day’s Journey Into Night (Lyric Theatre, also starring Charles Dance and Paul Rudd) and Francesca Annis in Ghosts (Comedy Theatre).

Casualty and Dynasty star Maxwell Caulfield, upon the news of Philips’ death, described him as a “borderline genius”.  Stargate: Atlantis actor Torri Higginson Tweeted “Thank you for your stories, lessons and demanding presence every second”.

Philips felt that theatre was a vocation – “We do it for reasons other than just to entertain. If we do it well we can make a huge difference to people’s lives.” He was awarded the Order Of Canada in 2005 and the Governor General’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2010.

He died on the morning of Saturday July 25 after a long illness and is survived by his long time partner Joe Mandel.